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Couple troubles. (1 Viewer)

alligATAR

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What would be the best animals to compare pentadactyl limbs? So far I have whale (flat thick humerus, radius and ulna, extended metacarpals and phalanges), Bat (extended metacarpal and phalanges for skin to stretch over, for wings) and human (allow maximum motion, support structure, thumb muscle for grasping items).
Also, does survival of the fittest refer to the organism that produces the strongest, healthiest offspring?
Lastly, how much of Charles Darwin will I require when talking about his influence on politics, society and economics? I have suvival of the fittest for Hitler, his controversial theories due to theocracy.

Thankyou :)
 

Queenroot

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I believe a horse also has a pentadactyl limb

Survival of the fittest refers to the organism that can produce the most offspring in numbers.

Not sure about the last one. I don't really think you should include anything about Hitler though.
 

BlueGas

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I believe a horse also has a pentadactyl limb

Survival of the fittest refers to the organism that can produce the most offspring in numbers.

Not sure about the last one. I don't really think you should include anything about Hitler though.
Is the last one even in the syllabus?
 

alligATAR

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I believe a horse also has a pentadactyl limb

Survival of the fittest refers to the organism that can produce the most offspring in numbers.

Not sure about the last one. I don't really think you should include anything about Hitler though.
Okay. is my reasoning for why the limb has evolved sufficient though?

I was told survival of the fittest was strongest offspring to survive, reproduce and pass on their genes..
 

Queenroot

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Okay. is my reasoning for why the limb has evolved sufficient though?

I was told survival of the fittest was strongest offspring to survive, reproduce and pass on their genes..
Yes it's sufficient however the point of comparative anatomy is to show that there are homologous structures meaning they all had a common ancestor at some point. You'd need to talk about that too.

To be able to pass on your traits and reproduce is to be fit. Survival of the fittest refers to number of offspring produced.
 

Queenroot

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Tbh it's a slippery slope. I understand that "fit" means desirable traits, but if you cannot reproduce then pretty much you're not really fit at all.
 

alligATAR

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Tbh it's a slippery slope. I understand that "fit" means desirable traits, but if you cannot reproduce then pretty much you're not really fit at all.
I see, I'm skimming over the word survival. Thanks!

Would you be able to clarify the law of segregation and independent assortment? Is segregation in meiosis, when the gametes form, the allele's go into random cells, that is, the paternal chromosomes dont all go with the paternal chromosomes? Independent assortment occurs during metaphase when the chromosomes align in the centre of the cell ready to separate?

I hate Blueprint of life:mad2:
 

Queenroot

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I see, I'm skimming over the word survival. Thanks!

Would you be able to clarify the law of segregation and independent assortment? Is segregation in meiosis, when the gametes form, the allele's go into random cells, that is, the paternal chromosomes dont all go with the paternal chromosomes? Independent assortment occurs during metaphase when the chromosomes align in the centre of the cell ready to separate?

I hate Blueprint of life:mad2:
You'll remember that Mendel's first law is the law of segregation, which states that the alleles of a given locus segregate into separate gametes. Simply stated, a gene can have different alleles, or variants. However, each gamete only gets one allele of each gene.

Mendel's second law is the law of independent assortment, which states that the alleles of one gene sort into gametes independently of the alleles of another gene. They are usually independent events, like the probability of flipping a coin and landing heads twice in a row.

Is that clear or not? I found it on a website.
 

alligATAR

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You'll remember that Mendel's first law is the law of segregation, which states that the alleles of a given locus segregate into separate gametes. Simply stated, a gene can have different alleles, or variants. However, each gamete only gets one allele of each gene.

Mendel's second law is the law of independent assortment, which states that the alleles of one gene sort into gametes independently of the alleles of another gene. They are usually independent events, like the probability of flipping a coin and landing heads twice in a row.

Is that clear or not? I found it on a website.
Okay, so segregation is when only one allele of a gene goes into a gamete (25% chance; duplicate paternal and maternal chromosomes, yes?)
assortment is when gene's of a particular chromosome go to each ends of the cell when it splits in telophase? like C1 doesnt follow C3 to one side, they go wherever?
 

Queenroot

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Okay, so segregation is when only one allele of a gene goes into a gamete (25% chance; duplicate paternal and maternal chromosomes, yes?)
assortment is when gene's of a particular chromosome go to each ends of the cell when it splits in telophase? like C1 doesnt follow C3 to one side, they go wherever?
yes
 

alligATAR

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Last question! Is tRNA basically DNA? As it codes for the opposite of mRNA and mRNA is the opposite of DNA?
 

BlueGas

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If you need any more help ask Penguino, he sure does know alot about DNA replication :)
 

astab

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For comparative anatomy, you really only have to say that different species have similar forelimbs containing a humerus, radius, ulna, carpels, metacarpels and shoulder blades (which suggests that each specie originated from a common ancestor), however, each limb is used differently within each specie. This is an example of homology where the pentadactyl limbs are similarly structured across a variety of species eg. humans, whales, horses, birds, etc. but used differently eg. most mammals use their limbs for grasping, clenching objects, fish use their limbs/fins to swim, birds use their limbs (wings) for flying etc.

From the textbook I used, Hitler is mentioned. The theory validated his drive to produce a 'pure superior Aryan race' by eradicating those who didn't fit the description. Be careful as to how you word it though, in case you offend anyone.
 

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