HSC Physics Predictions / Thoughts (1 Viewer)

Fabrizio

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ur right, i find the more u look into shit in this course the more convoluted and contradictory things can get. its one of the few courses in which a deep understanding of the content doesnt *always* seem to be a massive drawcard
especially with the variations of doing stuff/representing stuff. I could never understand the vertical circle force formulas because i was over thinking them and then when i searched on internet it would define g as negative and the formula would have a plus instead of a minus etc
 

ktbffh11

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I have a question. How does binding energy fit into nuclear fission reactions? Does the lost mass become binding energy AND kinetic energy?

If this is the case, then why in the last question from the 2019 HSC do they not account for binding energy and assume that all the lost mass becomes kinetic energy?
 

ktbffh11

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I have a question. How does binding energy fit into nuclear fission reactions? Does the lost mass become binding energy AND kinetic energy?

If this is the case, then why in the last question from the 2019 HSC do they not account for binding energy and assume that all the lost mass becomes kinetic energy?
ok i did some research apparently the increase in binding energy per nucleon in fusion/fission reactions corresponds to a release of energy (as binding energy is actually considered a negative but that’s beyond the hsc syllabus) and that release of energy must manifest as kinetic energy.
 
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Bit of everything, obviously.
I reckon they’ll have some filler type questions on mod 5 but not much more. Medium answers on mod 6 and long answers should be more mod 7 and 8 oriented, that’s what seems most likely to me.
i bet theyll ask about experimental error too, whats the go with that/what types of error are there?
 

Speed’o’sound Sonic

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i bet theyll ask about experimental error too, whats the go with that/what types of error are there?
There two different types of error; off the top of my head there are
Random errors which have a random effect on accuracy and therefore if repeated enough should orient to the correct value. Random errors include human errors
Systematic errors where there is a flaw in either equipment or measurement, and are consistent in offset (e.g. incorrectly zeroing a scale) hence should offset the value by a consistent amount.
The difference is the consistency of offset and whether repetition would hypothetically undo the effect of the error
 
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There two different types of error; off the top of my head there are
Random errors which have a random effect on accuracy and therefore if repeated enough should orient to the correct value. Random errors include human errors
Systematic errors where there is a flaw in either equipment or measurement, and are consistent in offset (e.g. incorrectly zeroing a scale) hence should offset the value by a consistent amount.
The difference is the consistency of offset and whether repetition would hypothetically undo the effect of the error
ah man this is so much clearer thna any textbook or website, many many thanks!
 

Fabrizio

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As long as NESA doesn't pull any weird shit like this, I'll be aight
That questions isnt actually that bad. I would just say how it was discovered from relativistic momentum and then you can relate to the de broglie matter waves (the equations) and how it applies to nuclear power and production of energy in stars
 

Fabrizio

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Only good for basic scientific skills haha. I think it's likely there'll be a graphing question, only thing I don't want to see is an 'error bar' question
I guarantee at least half the marks lost of the question if its like "evaluate the accuracy, validity and reliability of practical..." or anything about error or scientific method. The line of best fit and using gradient to find something is pretty much guaranteed
 

Xanthi

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That questions isnt actually that bad. I would just say how it was discovered from relativistic momentum and then you can relate to the de broglie matter waves (the equations) and how it applies to nuclear power and production of energy in stars
How can you relativistic momentum or Dr Broglie matter waves to E=mc^2?

Also, those questions are bad. More marks can be deducted than expected because of some small element missing I.e you can get 7/9 even though everything seems to be there, that doesn't happen with calculation/derivation
 

Speed’o’sound Sonic

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How can you relativistic momentum or Dr Broglie matter waves to E=mc^2?

Also, those questions are bad. More marks can be deducted than expected because of some small element missing I.e you can get 7/9 even though everything seems to be there, that doesn't happen with calculation/derivation
Yeah, I think that question is a bit too open-ended, and would result in a tonne of marks last unless they had some revolutionary marking system.
I'm not too sure about de Broglie, perhaps the fact that the mass deficit is being converted into momentum, hence kinetic energy, due to the newfound nature of all matter? Seems like a bit of a stretch to say the least. I'd likely focus it around stars, nuclear power (both fusion and fission) and our overall understanding of matter via particle accelerators (i.e. the discovery of quarks, leptons and hadrons and consequent discovery of force carriers)
 

Xanthi

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Yeah, I think that question is a bit too open-ended, and would result in a tonne of marks last unless they had some revolutionary marking system.
I'm not too sure about de Broglie, perhaps the fact that the mass deficit is being converted into momentum, hence kinetic energy, due to the newfound nature of all matter? Seems like a bit of a stretch to say the least. I'd likely focus it around stars, nuclear power (both fusion and fission) and our overall understanding of matter via particle accelerators (i.e. the discovery of quarks, leptons and hadrons and consequent discovery of force carriers)
I'd imagine if this came in exam many marks would be lost for not justifying why it is one of the most important equations I.e comparing significance to Newton and Maxwell's equations e.g
 

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