What is this supposed to mean? (1 Viewer)

notme123

Active Member
Joined
Apr 14, 2020
Messages
140
Gender
Male
HSC
2021
Does this mean NESA can ask whatever they want for gravitation? In this year's HSC there was a gravitation question (31b) about the centre of mass (where the centre of mass of two planets is in between them?) which I believe is not in the syllabus. If it is in the syllabus please tell me where.1609894130531.png
Btw, the highest HSC mark for the physics HSC 2020 according to the UAC scaling report was 49.5 (or 99/100 for two units) which means no one got 100%(I think that's how it works). I'm assuming whoever got the highest lost marks in this centre of mass q.

P.S should I go ahead in physics over these holidays or stick to revising content?
 
Last edited:
Joined
Nov 18, 2019
Messages
32
Gender
Male
HSC
2019
With regards to the highlighted part, it gives NESA the freedom to ask whatever they want. This is a major part of the New Syllabus which makes it harder for students to predict questions and makes the exam harder.
So for a question like 31b, you needed to assume that since they travelled at a constant speed, they must be in uniform circular motion around a centre of mass - Circular path. This is an example of the infinite possibilities that NESA can ask, to make the Physics exam more difficult.
To answer your question, do a little bit of both. I remember going to project academy's procons during the holidays which was a sort of introduction to Mod 6 but still going over and revising earlier content is also important at the same time.
Hope this helps!
 

Eagle Mum

Active Member
Joined
Nov 9, 2020
Messages
244
Gender
Female
HSC
N/A
Perhaps they thought it was question that might be relevant to the definition of planets. 😉 Pluto’s moon is half it’s width and an eighth it’s mass so rather than Pluto’s moon orbiting around it, they orbit around each other. The centre of mass of this system is between these two bodies.
 

Edzion education

New Member
Joined
Aug 29, 2020
Messages
25
Gender
Male
HSC
2019
I've seen many students go ahead during the holidays, this usually gives them an edge and leads to stronger performance in the upcoming assessments of this term. However, those that do better also take time to recharge. Don't burn yourself out but it can be great to learn ahead.

Regards,
Edzion education
 

idkkdi

Well-Known Member
Joined
Aug 2, 2019
Messages
1,693
Gender
Male
HSC
2021
Does this mean NESA can ask whatever they want for gravitation? In this year's HSC there was a gravitation question (31b) about the centre of mass (where the centre of mass of two planets is in between them?) which I believe is not in the syllabus. If it is in the syllabus please tell me where.View attachment 29838
Btw, the highest HSC mark for the physics HSC 2020 according to the UAC scaling report was 49.5 (or 99/100 for two units) which means no one got 100%(I think that's how it works). I'm assuming whoever got the highest lost marks in this centre of mass q.

P.S should I go ahead in physics over these holidays or stick to revising content?
thereisnowaythehighestscorelostmarksonacentreofmassquestionlol.
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)

Top